Tag Archive | woman-centred care

Working on writing book about Birth

Anyone who knows me, knows that I’ve been working on writing a book about birth for a couple of years now. Anyone who’s ever written a book, knows that writing a book is a tricky process.

For me, the trickiest bit has been deciding on the angle to write it from. I know what specific topics I’m passionate about. I’m just trying to figure out how all the theses I have evolved over the years can fit together like nice a big puzzle. And how it’s going to have the most impact on improving the culture of birth in the world.

So far I have come up with an outline I’m pretty proud of. Here goes :

 

 

The Epistemology of Woman-Centred Maternity Care :

Bridging The Gap Between Natural and Medical Models of Birth

 

 

In the book I would like to offer solutions to a problem as I see it. While so many advancements have been made in the field of maternity care, and we now know more than ever before, the outline of the problem is this :

1.The statistical rates of mortality, morbidity and complications are still higher than they need to be in much of the world, as evidenced by considerably lower rates in a few places in the world. While poverty is a factor that contributes to much of those statistics, and is a factor that is beyond the scope of this book to address, there are other easier to address factors besides poverty that can be reduced, and I shall highlight some of them. The natural process of birth and medical management of birth exists in a delicate balance. Many experts point to evidence that overuse of medical intervention in birth has tipped the scales of safety towards less safe outcomes. While benefiting those who need it, it has been suggested that its over reliance and use on those who don’t need it has in fact, CAUSED some complications and poor outcomes for mothers and babies.

2.Beyond the statistics, are many women and children who are physically and emotionally damaged in small and large ways by the management of their births.

3. In an effort to avoid this overuse of medical techniques in birth, a small but growing percentage of the population of North America has turned instead to avoiding the hospital altogether as they do not feel safe giving birth there. There is also an alternative philosophy to the medical management model, which is woman-centred care. The field of midwifery is generally responsible for the knowledge produced on woman-centred maternity care, although many individual doctors practice this way, and not all midwives practice woman-centred care. Woman-centred care is the topic I would like to delve more deeply into in this book so that everyone can get a clearer picture of what that means, what it entails in real life practice and how it can make significant differences in outcomes as well as people’s real lives.
So while there is a body of knowledge that comes out of the experience of midwives and the experience of homebirth, there is a tremendous gap between that body of knowledge and mainstream medical maternity care.

4. Furthermore, the body of knowledge that is still missing from both these perspectives of midwives and medical professionals is the epistemology that can come from the experience of the women doing the birthing themselves. I would like to suggest that by piecing together the knowledge from individual women’s experiences and formulating a collective position, it would be possible to bring maternity care a a whole new standard, as well as bridge the gap between the medical and natural birth worlds.

Everything in our world is always improving and evolving. There is no reason why the culture of human birth should not. I strongly believe, however, that the improvements will not come from more technology, but from a deeper understanding into the human psyche of labouring women themselves. It is the inner mental and emotional experience of labour that can offer the clues to understanding the delicate hormonal balance that controls the normal process of birth. While medical advancements have made it safer than ever before to use medical interventions such as epidurals and cesareans in birth, they will probably always be less safe than the non-man-made process of birth. Just as infant formula can be made as close as possible to breastmilk, it will always remain a far cry because it is impossible to create the living enzymes, antibodies and ever changing micronutrients in breastmilk. The long term effects of medical interventions into the process of birth is far greater than anyone can comprehend. I would like to suggest, despite all our advancements and 100,000 years of human history, shockingly little is understood about the normal, uninterrupted process by which human beings come into the world. I would like to bring more understanding of this into mainstream knowing. It is my hope that by fitting the missing pieces together, we can have a future world where human beings start off their lives with less trauma and more love because it is this that makes us human.

 

I’m putting it out there for anyone reading this : If you would like to add your contribution to the book, please let me know. You can email me at kaurina at prenataljourney.ca or call 1 – 604 809 3288.

I am looking for : childbirth experts – midwives, doctors, nurses and doulas, as well as, moms who would like to add their own experiences.

I know your time is valuable, so I would make it as easier as possible for you to add your input. If you prefer to writing, you can write me an email on the aspect you would like to contribute. If you would like to do an interview instead, I can set up a convenient time for you to do an interview.

 

I appreciate your time and wisdom.