Tag Archive | expecting mothers

Community Birth Program in Surrey Memorial opens its doors

Community Birth Program in Surrey

A fantastic new program has opened in the Jim Pattison outpatient clinic at Surrey Memorial Hospital for expecting mothers in Surrey, Delta, White Rock and Langley. The Community Birth Program is modelled after the South Community Birth Program in Vancouver, BC.

Both the Vancouver and Surrey programs are based on the groundbreaking and innovative Collaborative Care model where Physicians, Midwives, Nurses and Doulas work together as a team. Doulas are provided to clients at no charge because of funding from Fraser Health Authority. That means that even low-income women, immigrant women or women who have never even heard of Doulas can have one to support them through pregnancy, labour and post-partum. The women are thrilled to bits to have someone give them personalized attention, in their own homes, and help them navigate the new territory of parenthood, especially if it’s also in a new country. (If you’re not sure what a doula does, read my page What is a Doula?)

Fraser Health decided to provide funding for this program because of the immense success the Vancouver program is having. Significantly lower c-section rates, shorter hospital stays and higher breastfeeding rates. These is all great news for mothers and babies, but also for the budget of the Medical Services Plan so it makes sense to fund doulas and midwifery/physician collaborative care if it’s going to save on the other end with reducing unnecessary medical  procedures.

Normally, reducing the medical budget compromises patient safety, but for maternity care in particular, there’s lots of room for reducing unnecessary medical procedures while not compromising necessary ones. For example, the World Health Organization suggests that the optimal C-section rate is probably around 15%. Less than that and women who really need it, may not be getting it, which is often the case in impoverished countries. But more than 15% and probably too many women are having cesareans that may not always be necessary.

To find out what the cesarean rate is in the hospitals near you in BC, go to British Columbia Cesarean Rates. For example, Surrey Memorial Hospital has a cesarean rate of  28.65%. So there’s room for reduction. While a small number of mother’s would rather have a cesarean, the vast majority would rather avoid one. So reducing rates would benefit moms as well as reduce costs. Pioneering programs, such as the Community Birth Program and many others that are effective at reducing intervention rates without compromising safety are important for helping maternity care providers as a whole understand how to effectively reduce rates. 

I’m really glad the Surrey Community Birth program has finally opened after years of preparation. It’s going to be a really positive direction for expecting moms in Surrey and the Fraser Valley. While maternity services in BC are already so good,  and has continued to improve over the past years, there is always room for improvement. 

What I would like to see is good quality prenatal education that is available to ALL first-time moms – that effectively teaches pregnancy nutrition, making informed choices and real labour coping strategies. (I say “effective” and “real” because obviously, I have my opinions about how ineffective and unrealistic some prenatal classes are in regards to those topics)

Choosing an appropriate caregiver for pregnancy is one of the most important decisions women make that effects the path their birth will take. I always teach in my prenatal classes how to figure out if your caregiver matches the kind of birth you want. But by the time they come to my classes, their already in their third trimester. It would be great if women got more information about caregiver choices early on (like before they even get pregnant, or at least in early pregnancy). When women go to their doctors for the first pregnancy test, what I would really like is for those doctors to provide a handout about the three kinds of maternity care providers in BC – Family Physicians and Midwives for low-risk pregnancies and Obstetricians for high-risk pregnancies. 

I would also like every pregnant woman to be informed by her initial doctor about what a doula is and how a doula can help her in labour and delivery. It is up to the woman to choose if she wants one or not, but I believe every woman should at least get the information that such support exists and is proven to be helpful. There have been numerous scientific studies which prove the effectiveness of doula support at reducing unnecessary medical procedures while increasing maternal satisfaction and breastfeeding rates. If a doula were a drug, it would be unethical for doctors to not recommend them. But doulas are not a drug, and are not at the moment funded by the Medical Services Plan, so expecting families hire a doula privately. Maybe someday there will be MSP funded doulas available to all women. But for now, there are three options:

1. Find a volunteer doula. The BC Doulas Association has a list of newer doulas willing to volunteer their services. Give them a call. In Surrey, you may also be able to find a volunteer doula through the Healthiest Babies Possible Program.

2. Interview a few doulas in your area and ask if they are flexible with their rates or if they have payment plans. I am very flexible with my rates because I know not everyone can afford them but I am passionate about providing support to women who want it, and lots of doulas feel the same way.

3. Register with the South Community Birth Program if you live in Vancouver or the Community Birth Program if you live in Delta, Surrey or Langley to get access to midwifery care, physician care and doula support.

If you are expecting and would like to register with the Community Birth Program go to Fraser Health – Community Birth Program for more information. If you would like to BECOME  a doula with them, also contact them.