Tag Archive | doula

I recently welcomed my fourth child into the world

I am absolutely ecstatic to announce that I had my fourth kid, and 2nd daughter in January 2015. She was welcomed into the world by her older brothers and sister with so much love.

Of course as a doula and prenatal teacher, I was very interested in putting all the skills I teach in my classes to good use in my own labour.

First of all, right from the beginning of my pregnancy, I wanted to choose the best health care provider that would be a good fit with my birth preferences. This is one of the most important things I tell my clients that will affect the kind of birth you have. Don’t just choose any random maternity care provider. Find the ones who best fit with the kind of person you are, and the kind of birth you want.

Secondly, birth can be unpredictable, so when things don’t follow the textbook version of labour, you have to make informed decisions regarding what to do. There are ALWAYS options. When my water broke and my labour didn’t start for over 24 hours, it was stressful because, of course, as a mom, you naturally worry. But I kept reviewing my options and the potential risks of all the options available and kept discussing things with my midwives. Just to be clear, I felt totally fine with having any medical intervention that was clearly necessary and helpful, but I also know when interventions are not entirely necessary. There are always risks to both sides – having a medical intervention or declining it. In my situation I had the options of going to the hospital to start an induction, using non-medical ways of starting labour (herbs/ acupuncture etc which can be highly effective), or simply waiting it out. That’s another reason moms love having a doula with them in pregnancy and labour – if unexpected situations arrive, the doula can often talk moms through the decision making process, empowering them with a range of information on options so that moms can make an informed choice and feel good about it.

I knew the risks and possible outcomes of all scenarios and decided to take various herbs to get labour started. I also know that emotions and ’emotional blockages’ can have a huge impact on labour. So with the help of my doula friend, I worked through any deep seated emotions I was having that could have been blocking my labour from starting. That was EXTREMELY helpful because after I realized a huge emotional block I was holding, and then let it go, my labour started soon after.

Thirdly, of course, is all the pain coping strategies I teach. Once labour started, the first half was the easy part. The key for that is to keep focussing on staying completely relaxed. Holding on to any tension or resistance will cause pain. I was able to feel no pain at all for the first half of the labour by breathing out all the pressure waves and making a low toning sound. You can try it now, just let yourself sigh with a deep sound. You naturally let all your tension go and you feel more grounded. Remember fear in labour = adrenaline = pain = more fear = more pain. You have to keep the adrenaline out of the equation in labour and keep deep breathing away any tension or pressure you feel building up. Pay attention to your body.

homebirth labouring mom As contractions intensified, I moved around, feeling for whatever positions felt more comfortable. Sitting, squating, standing, lunging, leaning forward on furniture, sitting backwards on the couch, swaying my hips etc. I was chatting with my doula, friend, mom, and midwives in between contractions. Eventually, I felt like leaving the living room and going up to my bedroom. In labour, women naturally experience a going within. They feel like they are going deeper and deeper inside themselves as labour progresses. A woman starts using more of her primitive, instinctual brain and less of the cerebral cortex. It is the instinctual part of the brain which controls the natural process of labour. Labour flows more smoothly when a woman is undisturbed so she can smoothly go deep within herself. Any distractions that pull a woman out of this state of mind will slow down the labour and also create unnecessary pain sensations. Bright lights, too much talking, asking questions, talking about time (which is a cerebral concept), telling a woman what to do so she can’t listen to her own body’s instincts, disturbances like frequent blood pressure checks, vaginal exams etc. will all take a woman away from her “labour land” state of mind. And to the labouring woman, this feels quite irritating.

I told my midwives that I wanted a very hands off approach to my birth. I didn’t want any unnecessary disturbances such as internal dilation checks or them telling me what to do. But having them there in the background helped me feel safe in the rare situation where medical help might be needed. It is important for birthing moms to feel safe and supported. That will lead to a smooth labour process. Anything that makes them feel worry, fear or anxiety will cause a slowing down of the labour process, or even complications.

homebirth labouring momOnce I got to my bedroom, the lights were off with just a dim light on in the bathroom. My older daughter had woken up by this point and she lit some candles to add to the mood of the room. My mom made sure the music playlist I had put together for the birth was still playing. I had complied a series of songs that I found both inspiring and relaxing. I love music and I find it helps me set the tone for focusing on feeling good. In labour, you want to take your attention off the pain sensations and replace them with anything that makes you feel good. My doula was massaging my sacrum while holding a hot pack on my lower back. My husband rubbed my back and shoulders. That all felt really good. By this point, I was not feeling zero pain, like in the earlier part of the labour, but all these things helped take the edge off the intensity of contractions so they were completely manageable.

People often tell me that I’m brave to have a homebirth. Nothing could be further from the truth. The truth is, in terms of pain management, homebirth is often easier to manage because I feel more comfortable at home and there are so much fewer disturbances to my instinctual state of being. In terms of safety, solid evidence shows that homebirth is as safe, if not safer, than hospital birth, as long as it’s a healthy pregnancy, there are trained care providers in attendance, and a hospital is less than an hour’s drive away if there is a need to transfer. Here in the lower mainland, BC, Canada, we are so lucky to have a fantastic midwifery system that functions relatively smoothly at home or hospital. If you feel more comfortable having a homebirth, definitely go for it, or at least look into it. If you feel safer and more comfortable in a hospital, then hospital is the place for you. Birthing moms should be in the place that is more conducive to them feeling safe and supported. You have to know yourself, and know what you prefer. It doesn’t matter what anybody else does. It only matters what kind of experience you want and how you’re going to get it.

waterbirth home birthEventually, my contractions got pretty strong and I wondered if getting in the bathtub with warm water would help. I wasn’t particularly planning a waterbirth, but I always keep my options open. The warm water does take the edge of, but of course, labour is still a pretty intense and powerful process. At one point I joked with my midwife, “So you brought an epidural with you, didn’t you?”

“Yeah, it’s just in my back pocket,” she smiled.

“Oh good. I wouldn’t want to be crazy enough to have a natural birth.” 🙂

(Just in case you didn’t know, you can’t have an epidural or any other drugs at a homebirth because of the risk those things entail.)

I remember, through one contraction I just swore the whole way. Then for the next one I struggled to remember what the purpose of all the pain was. Oh yeah, to open the cervix and let the baby out. So I started chanting “Open, open…” through the whole contraction, while visualizing my cervix opening fully, quickly and easily. Soon after that I started to feel worried. I had the presence of mind to remind myself that this was a normal emotion during transition (the last bit of the dilation phase before the pushing phase). I was worried that this would go on forever and the baby would never come out. It’s common to have this rush of irrational feelings in transition, and a doula often reassures a labouring mom that this is a natural part of the process and it’s good sign that means things are progressing. It is important for the mom to go back to her state of feeling safe and relaxed instead of letting the worry and the adrenaline intensify. Again, smooth, fast and instinctual pushing phase vs. prolonged and worried pushing.

homebirth, waterbirthI soon began to feel “pushy”, meaning I felt like pushing a little at the peak of each contraction. I let the midwives know so they could get ready and everyone else too. My younger two kids were woken up so they could be present for the birth. I tried different positions in the tub – on my back, side, hands and knees, until I found the most comfortable position for myself, which just happened to be squatting facing the width of the tub instead of lengthwise so my feet could push against the side while my back rested on the other side.

Pushing contractions feel different than dilation contractions because you’re not just trying to relax through each one. You’re actually actively pushing with each one. And in a drug free birth, you can feel the powerful force of your body pushing instinctively. It’s not something you can stop. It’s like one mom said, it feels like you’re body is just vomiting the baby out. It’s so strong and so involuntary. In a drug free birth, no one has to tell the mom how to push. Her body just does it. Pushing feels way more fun than the dilation phase before it. I felt very powerful.

Once the baby’s head was low enough in my pelvis, I could feel it. It was definitely a strange sensation and I exclaimed to all the 10 people who, by now had piled into my bathroom, “It feels like a bowling ball.” I put my finger in and felt the top of the baby’s head less than an inch away. A couple more pushes later and I could feel her head crowning. This feels like a burning sensation as the perineum stretches around the baby’s head. I expected this part to take a while, as it can take several pushes to slowly push the head out. But my body just kept going and in one push she went from completely inside to completely out. I had planned to catch her myself if possible, but she came so fast. No one was quite ready for that. Luckily my husband was speedy quick in catching her and lifting her out of the water and onto my tummy. She was happy and content sitting on my tummy, looking around.

homebirth, waterbirthWe hadn’t found out the gender, so it was very exciting to look down and see it was a girl. My daughter finally got the sister she had been hoping for for so long. Here’s the picture that captures the sheer intensity of emotions of that moment right after birth – relief that it’s over, exuberance over the new person you are meeting, and for me the shock of how fast she came out and surprise that I got the girl I wanted.

It was a lovely family experience to have all my kids there, my mom, sister-in-law and friend. My husband caught the baby, my daughter took the photos, my older son cut the cord and my younger son helped the midwife weigh the baby. My kids will all grow up knowing that birth is just a normal, natural and safe part of life. Not something to fear. By the way, I wanted to wait till after the placenta was out to cut the cord, or at least until the blood in the placenta had finished pumping to the baby, instead of cutting the cord immediately. This is so that she can get her full blood volume and have a gentle transition to life on the outside.

Once I got out of the tub and walked back to my bed, I birthed the placenta and breastfed my baby before letting everyone else have her for some cuddles. My mom made me a nutritious, yummy smoothie with a tiny piece of placenta blended in. Having a bit of placenta reduces the risk of postpartum hemorrhage.

It was a lovely morning. I stayed in bed all day snuggling my new sweetheart. And the other kids were just over the moon excited with their tiny sister. Plus they got to take a day off school. 🙂

newborn baby holding mom's finger

 

 

 


 

Memoirs of a Doula part 3 – Special Memories

Being a Doula

People often ask me, “What’s it like being a Doula?”

It’s intense. I get to witness such a wide range of human emotions, from fear and desperation, to inner strength and triumph, to extreme joy and jubilation. I get to be there through a woman’s most challenging and vulnerable moments and watch the expressions on her face on her journey to discovering inner strength she never knew she had. I get to revel in the wonder that quietly surrounds every newborn person that comes into this world – that tingly awe of a natural and unexplainable meditation that comes over you when you allow yourself to feel what a newborn feels. husband-wife-newborn-baby-hospital-photo

The world of birth is so far removed – emotionally and mentally, from daily life, it always takes me many hours to readjust to mundane existence after I return home from a birth. I always feel as if the tremendous journey of every birth should make headline news, but it stays largely unknown to the public, summarized into the petty details of gender and weight of the baby. I feel so humbled and privileged to be witness to one of the most special human events which remains so unknown to the general public. And because, as a doula I am not responsible for doing anything medical or charting or watching monitors, and I am there for each mother throughout her labour and birth no matter how long it takes, I am right there with her feeling it with her. Well, not really – a little less pain, just all the emotions. Every birth is different and unique and every birth moves me and changes me. Every birth teaches me a little more about myself, about women, about babies, about human beings and about the wonder of life.

Most of all, I love being a Doula because every birth has such special memories for me as well as for the parents. Just like weddings can hold such special memories for people, so too can their children’s births. I will always have a special place in my heart for each set of parents whose birth I have been to. My hope is that I have helped make the experience be filled with more positive memories and resolved the stressful ones. I try to highlight the awesomeness of each mom and dad and baby so that they will start this important journey of parenthood feeling good about themselves.

When I think back over all the births I’ve been to, some stand out because of the difficulty the mom went through but overcame triumphantly, some stand out because of the funny comments made by either the mom or dad (tactful humour in the delivery room always helps to lighten the mood), and some stand out because of the great love that existed between the mom and dad and baby. Wouldn’t it be nice if that’s what made headline news in the world. Not wars and crimes. This is what humanity is made of. And I am grateful to be a part of it.

Thank you to all the couples who have allowed me to be present for this very special time.

 

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If you or someone you know is expecting and you would like more information about birth doula support in Surrey, Langley or the Lower Mainland, BC, Canada,

you may contact Kaurina Danu at 604 809 3288 or kaurina @ prenatal journey . ca

 

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Read : Memoirs of a Doula part 1 – Why I Do What I Do

and    Memoirs of a Doula part 2 – Love In The Delivery Room

 

© Kaurina Danu of Prenatal Journey 2013

 

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How to know when Vaginal Exams in Pregnancy and Labour are useful and when they are harmful?

Vaginal Exams  are commonly done in labour by nurses, doctors and midwives to find out how dilated the labouring mom’s cervix is. Other terms that refer to the same procedure are VE’s, Internal Exams or Pelvic Exams. It is basically putting two fingers in the vagina all the way up to the cervix to feel :

1. How DILATED (open) the cervix is

2. How soft and short the cervix is (EFFACED)

3. Which direction the cervix is facing – POSTERIOR (to the back) or ANTERIOR (to the front, when labour progresses)

4. Where the baby’s head is in relation tot he pelvic bones (STATION)

5. And what position the baby’s head is facing.

While this can be a very useful procedure to find out very useful information, women also need to understand the full picture.

First of all, the damn thing hurts. It ranges from slightly uncomfortable to downright excruciating. Now remember, in nature female animals and humans don’t regularly go around sticking things up their cervix to cause even more pain and irritation when doing one of the most difficult and intense jobs in their lives – giving birth.

Secondly, it is not an exact science. It is not as if they are putting a ruler in down there. They’re just feeling around and making an estimate with their fingers and their experience.

Thirdly, having too many done can introduce germs and cause an infection, especially if several are done after the water has broken. In general, VE’s should be kept to a minimum and used wisely, but after the water has broken, this guideline should be followed even more strictly. I have seen some births where The rupture of membranes happened days before birth (called premature rupture of membranes), but there was no infection because they were extremely careful to avoid internal exams and instead assess progress by external signs. And I have seen births where the rupture of membranes happened normally at the start of labour * but an unnecessary number of pelvic exams were done, only to cause infections in the mom so that they had to have cesareans.

* Note : Most labours start with contractions and the water breaks towards the end of labour (around transition which is between 8 – 10cm dilation). Only 20% of labour start with the water breaking and then contractions follow soon after. If contractions don’t start within 12 hours of the water breaking, it is called Premature Rupture of Membranes (PROM). 

Be wary of having students nurses, doctors or midwives at your labour. They need to learn how to do VE’s effectively, so they do one, then the mentor does one to make sure they’re estimate is right. Then when there is a shift change, the new person might want to do another one. All of this is unnecessary and simply risky once the water has broken.

Some caregivers do internal exams towards the end of pregnancy because they want to guestimate how soon you’re labour will start. Some caregivers don’t do any internals before labour because they don’t see any point in it. They figure labour will start when it starts. There are some changes that take place before labour. The thing is, there is no way of knowing when labour will start because the changes can take place, but then no action may happen for weeks, or no changes may happen and then in a very short time, everything can happen and labour can be quick.

About.com provides a brilliant article in their Pregnancy and Childbirth called The Myth of Vaginal Exams

Labor is not simply about a cervix that has dilated, softened or anything else. A woman can be very dilated and not have her baby before herdue date or even near her due date. I’ve personally had women who were 6 centimeters dilated for weeks. Then there is the sad woman who calls me to say that her cervix is high and tight, she’s been told that this baby isn’t coming for awhile, only to be at her side as she gives birth within 24 hours. Vaginal exams are just not good predictors of when labor will start.

Some practitioners routinely do what is called stripping the membranes, which simply separates the bag of waters from the cervix. The thought behind this is that it will stimulate the production of prostaglandins to help labor begin and irritate the cervix causing it to contract. This has not been shown to be effective for everyone and does have the aforementioned risks.

So another reason some caregivers do weekly pelvic exams from about 37 weeks onwards is, if the cervix is slightly dilated enough to fit a finger in, they might try separating the amniotic sac from the uterus to try to hasten the start of labour. Some caregivers ask for permission before doing this, but some don’t even inform the women about what they are doing. So if you do not want his done, make sure you discuss it before allowing a pelvic exam in pregnancy. A lot of women get fed up with being pregnant and want this procedure done in hopes of speeding up the start of labour. But not all women want to do that. Know what you want and let your caregiver know what you want.

Fourthly, the results of a VE can be very discouraging if they aren’t what you expect. A woman who is in intense labour with contractions coming one on top of the other may be feeling that she’s in transition, yet have a VE say she’s only 6cm. This can be discouraging. The thing is, she may actually progress very quickly to 10. Where you are now has no relationship whatsoever with how fast you are going.

The fifth thing to consider will help you determine when a pelvic exam might be useful and when it might be useless or harmful – Will the information from the exam help us make a decision about the course of action ?

A lot of vaginal exams are done just for the heck of it to “assess progress”. Most of the time this is unnecessary and leads to unnecessary cesareans. Sometimes there may be no dilation for hours. There can be several reasons for this :

  • The baby might be rotating into a better position to fit through the pelvis. To understand how the baby’s rotation can help it fit, watch my video at Understanding Optimal Fetal Positioning.
  • The mom might be feeling anxious or stressed, which can inhibit labour from progressing. To understand how emotions can effect labour, Read my article.
  • Or there may be a genuine problem that cannot be solved except with medical intervention.
So the question to ask your caregiver if they are suggesting an exam that you are unsure about is, “What will you find out from the exam and what might you do based on what you find out?”

Usually two basic VE’s are done in labour, although sometimes even these are not necessary. One is when you get to the hospital, or if you are having a homebirth, when the midwife gets to your house. They usually do a VE to check if you are in active labour (4cm or more). Before active labour, the hospital will send you home, and the midwife will go home. Early labour can take hours and there is no point of being in the hospital before then unless there is some medical problem. If you are past 4cm, they will get you a room in the hospital, or the homebirth midwife might call the second midwife to get ready to come.

The second VE may be done when you feel an overwhelming urge to push. They may want to make sure there is no cervical lip left before you start pushing. In both these cases, action will be taken based on the results of the VE.

Other times that a VE may be useful are when a mom is really asking for medical pain relief. The amount of dilation will determine what kind of pain relief (epidural or morphine) may be appropriate or whether labour is close to the end and maybe no pain relief is necessary.

The thing is, some VE’s are done just for the sake of charting purposes. There is a ridiculous theory that dilation ought to be at least one cm every 2 hours. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that different people do things at different rates and that’s ok. It doesn’t mean anything is wrong.

The important thing is to limit the number of VE’s done by figuring out if the information they provide will help you and your caregiver make decisions about what to do next. Don’t take the results of VE’s to seriously. Don’t get discouraged if it’s not what you expect. (I know that’s easier said than done.) And try to have only one person do the VE’s in labour instead of different people and different opinions.

 

To find out more about prenatal education, natural birth information or doula support in labour in Surrey or Langley BC email kaurina @ prenataljourney.ca or call 604 809 3288.

 

Book now before prices for prenatal and birth services go up!

The prices for Prenatal Classes and Doula Support will be going up as of Aug 15th 2012, so if you would like to get the current prices, book now.

Weekend prenatal classes are in the Surrey / Langley area of BC, Canada. Private prenatal classes for first-time parents as well as experienced parents are anywhere in the Lower Mainland from Vancouver to Abbotsford.

Doula Support now includes complementary Birth Photography.

For more information about The Prenatal Journey’s prenatal class philosophy and content go to Prenatal Classes.

For info on schedules and current class pricing, go to Schedules.

For services and package deals as of Aug 15th, go to Services and Packages.

Belly Henna SurreyCheck out the new services like Belly Henna and Belly Casts

and Birth Photography

Working on writing book about Birth

Anyone who knows me, knows that I’ve been working on writing a book about birth for a couple of years now. Anyone who’s ever written a book, knows that writing a book is a tricky process.

For me, the trickiest bit has been deciding on the angle to write it from. I know what specific topics I’m passionate about. I’m just trying to figure out how all the theses I have evolved over the years can fit together like nice a big puzzle. And how it’s going to have the most impact on improving the culture of birth in the world.

So far I have come up with an outline I’m pretty proud of. Here goes :

 

 

The Epistemology of Woman-Centred Maternity Care :

Bridging The Gap Between Natural and Medical Models of Birth

 

 

In the book I would like to offer solutions to a problem as I see it. While so many advancements have been made in the field of maternity care, and we now know more than ever before, the outline of the problem is this :

1.The statistical rates of mortality, morbidity and complications are still higher than they need to be in much of the world, as evidenced by considerably lower rates in a few places in the world. While poverty is a factor that contributes to much of those statistics, and is a factor that is beyond the scope of this book to address, there are other easier to address factors besides poverty that can be reduced, and I shall highlight some of them. The natural process of birth and medical management of birth exists in a delicate balance. Many experts point to evidence that overuse of medical intervention in birth has tipped the scales of safety towards less safe outcomes. While benefiting those who need it, it has been suggested that its over reliance and use on those who don’t need it has in fact, CAUSED some complications and poor outcomes for mothers and babies.

2.Beyond the statistics, are many women and children who are physically and emotionally damaged in small and large ways by the management of their births.

3. In an effort to avoid this overuse of medical techniques in birth, a small but growing percentage of the population of North America has turned instead to avoiding the hospital altogether as they do not feel safe giving birth there. There is also an alternative philosophy to the medical management model, which is woman-centred care. The field of midwifery is generally responsible for the knowledge produced on woman-centred maternity care, although many individual doctors practice this way, and not all midwives practice woman-centred care. Woman-centred care is the topic I would like to delve more deeply into in this book so that everyone can get a clearer picture of what that means, what it entails in real life practice and how it can make significant differences in outcomes as well as people’s real lives.
So while there is a body of knowledge that comes out of the experience of midwives and the experience of homebirth, there is a tremendous gap between that body of knowledge and mainstream medical maternity care.

4. Furthermore, the body of knowledge that is still missing from both these perspectives of midwives and medical professionals is the epistemology that can come from the experience of the women doing the birthing themselves. I would like to suggest that by piecing together the knowledge from individual women’s experiences and formulating a collective position, it would be possible to bring maternity care a a whole new standard, as well as bridge the gap between the medical and natural birth worlds.

Everything in our world is always improving and evolving. There is no reason why the culture of human birth should not. I strongly believe, however, that the improvements will not come from more technology, but from a deeper understanding into the human psyche of labouring women themselves. It is the inner mental and emotional experience of labour that can offer the clues to understanding the delicate hormonal balance that controls the normal process of birth. While medical advancements have made it safer than ever before to use medical interventions such as epidurals and cesareans in birth, they will probably always be less safe than the non-man-made process of birth. Just as infant formula can be made as close as possible to breastmilk, it will always remain a far cry because it is impossible to create the living enzymes, antibodies and ever changing micronutrients in breastmilk. The long term effects of medical interventions into the process of birth is far greater than anyone can comprehend. I would like to suggest, despite all our advancements and 100,000 years of human history, shockingly little is understood about the normal, uninterrupted process by which human beings come into the world. I would like to bring more understanding of this into mainstream knowing. It is my hope that by fitting the missing pieces together, we can have a future world where human beings start off their lives with less trauma and more love because it is this that makes us human.

 

I’m putting it out there for anyone reading this : If you would like to add your contribution to the book, please let me know. You can email me at kaurina at prenataljourney.ca or call 1 – 604 809 3288.

I am looking for : childbirth experts – midwives, doctors, nurses and doulas, as well as, moms who would like to add their own experiences.

I know your time is valuable, so I would make it as easier as possible for you to add your input. If you prefer to writing, you can write me an email on the aspect you would like to contribute. If you would like to do an interview instead, I can set up a convenient time for you to do an interview.

 

I appreciate your time and wisdom.

Great article called “What is the evidence for doulas?”

Ok, this is probably the most comprehensive explanation of why someone might want to hire a doula I have ever read, and it comes complete with a concept diagram of the whole thing!

Rebecca Dekker starts out by saying,

When I was pregnant with my first child, I briefly considered hiring a doula. I saw the doula flyers at Baby Moon, where I did prenatal yoga, and I thought it sounded kind of cool. But when I talked to my husband about it, he felt a little squeamish about the idea. We are both pretty private people (although you wouldn’t think it now that I blog about birth), and he didn’t want anybody else there. He just wanted it to be him and me. And he felt like he would do a good job of supporting me. At the time, it made sense. But hindsight, as they say, is 20-20.

Now all I can say is what were we thinking? How could it possibly be just him and me at the birth, anyways? We were planning to birth in a hospital! A teaching hospital, no less! Where there would be strange residents and students coming and going, and where we had no control over who we got as a labor and delivery nurse. And this was my first birth! It is so important to avoid a C-section in your first birth, because that sets the tone and risk level for all of the rest of your births (and we wanted to have at least 4 children, too). I knew on some mental level that doulas lower the risk of C-section, but I guess I just didn’t realize how important doulas are. Well, I do now. So today, I am going to talk to you about the evidence for having a doula present at your birth.

So true! I can relate because during my first pregnancy, I couldn’t imagine what I would need a doula for too. All that changed once I was in labour. To read my story you can go to Birth Stories.

Rebecca goes on to explain the randomized controlled trials that prove how effective doulas can be for improving labour and baby outcomes. To read the rest of the article, click read the article here.

The absolute craziest thing is how after so much research, the medical profession isn’t like totally promoting doulas to every pregnant woman. The fact is, if doulas were a drug, it would be unethical not to recommend them. But they’re not a drug. They’re people. And so, right now, only the people who already get it, are choosing to have a doula. I hope by the time my daughter is having kids, every pregnant woman is informed about doulas and exactly how they can help, so she can make an informed choice, instead of of what I usually hear, which is, “I wish I had known about doulas BEFORE I gave birth!”

Love In The Delivery Room – Memoirs of a Doula part 2

You wouldn’t expect labour and delivery rooms in hospitals to be places of great romance, but I’ve seen it with my own eyes. Much has been written about the love between mothers and their newborns. Sometimes it’s a quiet, gentle love, and sometimes it’s an overwhelming, life changing love. But the kind I’m talking about right now is the love between the mom and the dad in labour.

The media has solidified an image of the interaction between moms and dads in the delivery room revolving around the mom swearing profanities at the dad, and the dad being mostly clueless and bumbling. I honestly don’t know how representative that is of most labours because I don’t see most labours. I only see the ones I’m doulaing for. And what I see is the deeply moving culmination of the romance and bond of the two people who have worked so hard and put so much of themselves into bringing forth a new life.

I see men who love and care for their wives and newborn children with so much strength and intensity. I am profoundly touched every time I see a dad wrapping his arms around his wife’s shoulders, putting his forehead against hers, supporting her through contractions, loving her with every fibre of his being. Every time a dad goes hours, tirelessly massaging his wife’s back to take the edge of each contraction, or holds her under the shoulders to support her weight if she’s more comfortable in an upright position but is too tired to support her own weight.

I see the look in their eyes as they look at their wives with awe of her strength and beauty through the whole amazing process of birth. The worry and concern they have if their wife is having a hard time. I see women holding on to their partners for solace, or resting their heads against their partners chest to help them relax. I see dad watch mom’s every move, anticipating when she might need a sip of water or a cold cloth to wipe her brow. The sweet whisperings of encouragement and love. I see the tears of joy or beams of radiance when dads hold their newborns for the first time. It’s such a well deserved high for both the mom and dad who’ve worked so hard together.

I see men who will be forever changed by the experience of being so helpful and supportive of their wives through labour. It deeply strengthens their relationship and connection to their partners and their children.

I don’t know what dads are like at births I’ve not been at. I imagine some men are naturally great at supporting their partners in labour, and some are not because they are feeling unsure, overwhelmed or disconnected. I know some parents-to-be, when considering if they want to have a doula with them at their birth, are concerned that the doula will take over the dads role. I can understand that concern, but actually, it’s quite the opposite.

I don’t ever take over the dad’s role. That is the primary relationship that the doula can never replace. The dad is so helpful in the delivery room just by being there and loving his partner. I always recognize and support their relationship. I’m just there for a short period of their lives, but they are the ones who are going to be raising their child together for years, so I try to enhance their connection during this intense experience of labour and birth.

For the men who are unsure about what to do in the delivery room, they quickly gain more confidence by watching what I’m doing and figuring out how they can support their wives. Quite often dad and I tag team to provide massage, counter pressure or hip squeezes to mom for hours on end. If dad has any concerns, I am immediately there to answer all his questions as best I can. The dads never feel overwhelmed that too much responsibility is on their shoulders.

Occasionally I meet a dad at the prenatal visit who really does not want to be in the delivery room. If the mom doesn’t want him there, then it’s fine. But if she does, then I want to make sure I address his fears and make it clear that he can participate as much as he’s comfortable with since I will be there too. If he’s still not convinced, I talk to him about something extremely difficult he’s experienced or witnessed in his life. Then I get him to imagine the difference between having people to support him through it versus doing it totally alone. That’s always enough to flip the switch and motivate the dad to commit to being there no matter what.

Sometimes a dad will have a strong emotional reaction and it helps to have someone there to share it with instead of keeping it to themselves. One dad was really worried for his wife when she became sick with an infection in labour. He felt relieved after talking to me about his fears. Another dad took me aside after the birth to talk to me. The intensity of the experience brought up memories of their previous child who was stillborn. He recounted his last experience and said that him and his wife had no one to support them through that. They felt so alone. In contrast, this time, they felt so supported. He thanked me for, “caring for his wife better than her mother could have.” I was so moved by this man’s love for his wife, the strength of their bond through their shared experiences and the deep healing of the past hurt.

I am confident that these couples will go on with their lives with more love and connection than before their birth experience. I know the dads will continue to express their profound love beyond the delivery room in practical ways – caring for their newborn, waking up in the middle of the night to rock a crying baby or change a diaper, working extra hours to provide for their families.

 

Romance in the delivery room is such a special thing and I am so grateful to be able to witness it. What are your thoughts and experiences? Leave your comments below.

Memoirs of A Doula part 1 – Why I do What I do

Many people say to me when they find out I’m a doula, “What a great job! It must be so nice to be able to hold so many newborn babies!”

But in reality, I am not a doula because I like newborns, although they are fantastically amazing, miraculous, fascinating people newborns are. I do it because of the MOMS. I do it because I know the simple things I do can and will have a life changing impact, not only on the women and their birth experience, but because it changes lives. I do it because when I focus all of my attention on caring for moms at one of the most important, challenging and vulnerable times of their lives, they are better able to care for themselves, their babies, their children and their families. I take care of the emotional needs of the dads as well in that critical period, so that the couple’s memories of the start of their child’s life is that of love, care, pride and strength. Not that of stress, anxiety desperation and disempowerment.

Sometimes it’s hard to know if what I’m doing is making a difference, because pregnancy, birth and the post-partum time can still be fraught with challenges. But the moms and dads make it clear how important it was to have someone there they could always call day or night if they were worried about anything, how it important it was for someone to be only focused on what they were thinking, how they were feeling, and doing all the little things to help them feel good.

In the big picture, I do it because I believe that each family who starts out with love and care, will raise more loving and caring people. And doulas the world over are helping to change the world one birth at a time.

Question : Generally speaking, does giving birth have to be painful?

Cassandra Wilson from  Healing Horizon for Emotional Energy Healing asks, “Does giving birth have to be painful?”

The simple answer is, “NO, but for most women it is.”

No one actually knows why labor feels painful. There are many theories. It’s sort of like what causes period cramps and why do some women feel period cramps and others not?

The part of labor that is mostly “painful” is the contractions of the uterus which pull back on the cervix to dilate it. The uterus is the strongest muscle in the human body so when it gets going, it’s pretty powerful. The brain interprets these intense sensations as pain.

Some women either naturally don’t feel pain at all or deliberately work to mentally and physically relieve the pressure and interpret the sensations positively instead of as pain. I’m not saying it’s an easy thing to do. You can’t just say ‘mind over matter’. It’s a lot deeper than that. Some women feel so overwhelmed with positive emotions and endorphins and love that they have an orgasmic birth.

The majority of women however, do feel pain, but let me separate the “good” pain from the “bad” pain. If you think of the natural process of birth ie. animals, tribal people, people who give birth in their home surroundings, the pain is never more than they can handle. A bit of pain can be useful. “Pain with a purpose.”

A bit of pain sends a signal to the brain to produce corticosteroids, which is the hormone that stimulates the baby’s lungs to produce surfactant. Surfactant coats the lungs so that the baby can breathe air when it’s born. Babies born by scheduled cesarean without labor tend to have a slightly higher risk of respiratory problems because they don’t have enough surfactants. Also, a bit of pain can be useful  in evolution for letting the mom know something big is happening so she needs to move to a safe place.

The other kind of pain is what I call “bad” pain. It is the kind of pain that is useful in letting us know that something is wrong, you need to do something about it. Think about when you have gotten a massage. The massage therapist presses on a sore point to relieve the pressure. It feels a bit painful, but it feels like a good pain. Then maybe she presses with her nails, or presses on a new injury. That feels like a something-is-wrong pain. You tell her to stop. Or like if you put your hand on a stove. The pain tells you to move. If you didn’t feel the pain, you wouldn’t know to move.

Labor is like that. There’s the normal intense sensation, and then there’s the something-is-wrong pain. The trouble is, as a culture, we have been programmed to believe that labor is supposed to be the most painful thing ever, so we don’t know what to do with that overwhelming intense pain. We just think, get an epidural.

There are a few factors which produce that kind of pain :

1. Being in a not so great position. Lying on your back is probably the most painful position to be in. It’s also the least optimal for the baby’s descent and rotation. In all tribal cultures studied, not a single woman labored on he back. The problem is, that’s the position we always see women giving birth in on TV. And hospitals tend to ask women to labor or birth lying back because the fetal heart monitor works best that way, and it is convenient for the hospital staff. If a woman is listening to the pain as  information from her body, she would lie down, say, “oh that’s too painful,” then change to a different position. Some other more comfortable positions might be sitting, kneeling, standing or even lying on the side.

2. Another factor is having a labor that is induced or augmented with artificial oxytocin or prostaglandins. These can make contractions more intense than natural labor, and the uterus may not relax as much in between contractions. Other kinds of interventions can also restrict mom’s movement, disturb her from fully relaxing in between contractions and being able to go inside herself, breathe and focus while she is having contractions. These can cause a greater perception of pain.

3. Another huge factor is what is called the fear-pain cycle. When mothers feel safe, and supported, they’re bodies produce oxytocin effectively and when labor gets going, they produce endorphins. But when moms feel anxious, disturbed, unsafe, stressed or fearful, they produce adrenalins, which inhibit oxytocin, endorphins, and make the sensation of pain feel much more intense. This is telling the body that something is wrong. Mom doesn’t feel safe. This is when labor feels like unbearable pain. Knowing this, Mom and the people supporting her can help reduce her anxiety and help her feel safe and supported.

A lot of research has been done on having a Doula (professional, non-medical labor support) in childbirth. They found that doulas help reduce the need for epidurals, cesareans and instrumental deliveries by about half. The reason for this is that doulas are trained, and focused on reducing moms fear and stress as it comes up, and helping her feel safe, supported and confident in her own abilities. This doesn`t just make for a more pleasant experience. Moms`emotions in labor affect the hormones she produces, which affect the amount of pain she feels as well as whether labor will be smooth or complicated.

I teach a whole in-depth class on how to have less pain in labor, or even no pain, so It can`t be summarized effectively in a post. Let me know if you want to find out about pain-free birth. 604 809 3288.

 

 

How Emotions Affect Labor and Birth – Part 1

We all know things like poor nutrition, lack of exercise, smoking, alcohol and drugs can have negative effects on the course of pregnancy and the chances of having complications in labor and birth. We’ve also been told that we should try to reduce stress levels when we’re pregnant because stress can have a negative impact on the health of the pregnancy. But just how important is your emotional health to the health of your baby? And do emotions play a significant role in whether you have a smooth or complicated birth?

This is a relatively new field of study, but it is increasingly becoming evident that health in general, and in particular, health in pregnancy, birth and post-partum is not only influenced by physical factors, but by emotional factors as well. This is an important new perspective because it means that when we’re experiencing upsetting situations, it may be detrimental to our health to just “sweep it under the carpet”. Learning how to process emotions, resolve negative issues and promote positive emotions may be as important as eating well, exercising and avoiding smoking or alcohol.

How do Emotions Affect Labor and Birth? Many professionals in the field of birth, such as French Obstetrician, Michel Odent, have observed that when laboring women feel safe, supported, and respected, they tend to experience less pain, have less complications in labor, bond more easily with their infants, have fewer problems breastfeeding, and feel more positively about themselves as mothers. Laboring women who feel anxious, stressed, unsafe or unsupported tend to experience more pain, have more problems with their labors, take longer to bond, have more difficulty breastfeeding and have less confidence in their mothering.

Yup, you heard me right. Negative emotions can cause labor pain to feel wwwwaaaaaayyyyyyyy worse!

Negative emotions can cause complications in labor. What?! Are you kidding?!

Think about it. When we’re afraid, in danger or stressed, we produce Adrenalin, the fight or flight hormone. Adrenalin inhibits or slows down body functions that are not critical for immediate survival, fighting, or running away. When mammals are in labor and a predator is in the area, the mammal mom produces adrenalin which inhibits labor. This is helpful because 1. She can run away to a safer place, and 2. She wouldn’t want to have her baby near a predator who might then eat her baby.

Fear, or similar emotions, produce adrenalin. Adrenalin can slow down labor. So fear, anxiety or feeling unsafe can slow down or stop labor. You’ve probably heard of many women who had cesareans because they’re labors “weren’t progressing”. We don’t know if one of the causes could have been anxiety. More research into this needs to be done.

A recent study, featured in the Globe and Mail, shows that women who fear childbirth are more likely to have a cesarean. Click here if you want to read the article. What the article doesn’t explain is how to resolve those fears prior to birth.

Some useful questions to ask are, what causes fear and anxiety in labor (I’m sure you have a whole list in mind), and HOW do we resolve those negative emotions and promote positive ones? You can start your list about that too. We’ll talk about that in my next post How Emotions Affect Labor and Birth – Part 2.

Speaking of positive emotions, the flip side of this anxiety-adrenalin discussion is the love-oxytocin discussion. Interestingly, oxytocin, the hormone that starts and controls contractions in labor, is called the love hormone because it is also produced when breastfeeding, bonding with infants, falling in love, making love, getting a massage, thinking about something you love, talking to your best friend and who knows what other things.

Loving feelings, relaxation, relationship bonding promote the production of oxytocin. Oxytocin is necessary for effective contractions. Therefore it makes sense, and often is the case in practice, that women who feel loved, safe and supported have smoother labors. Obviously, women find it helpful to have their partners with them in the delivery room, assuming their partners are loving and relatively calm. That may also be one of the reasons that doulas are so effective at reducing the need for interventions in labor. Doulas provide continuous support throughout labor and are focused on mom’s emotional needs so she can resolve her anxiety and enhance her feelings of support.

So if you are pregnant, use this article as an excuse to do whatever it takes to feel good 🙂 And if you are upset or anxious about something, don’t sit with that for too long. Do whatever you do to feel better. Talk to your caregiver, talk to a friend, have a bubble bath, get a massage, go for a walk or talk to your doula.

Leave your thoughts in the comments box below, or contact me at 604 809 3288 or info@prenataljourney.ca

© copyright 2011 Kaurina Danu The Prenatal Journey