Don’t fall into the trap of “The Big Baby Fear”!

When I had my second kid, who was 9 pounds at birth, I thought that was pretty big. In fact, most of the doctors and nurses at the hospital were also surprised at his size. But then I started meeting tons of women who said to me, “9 pounds! That’s nothing my baby was 10 and a half.” One woman even said, “I had my 11 pound baby naturally no problem.” My midwife told me about a 5 foot woman she had as a client who had a 12 pound baby at home with no tears on her perineum.” Recently I read about the woman who gave birth naturally to a 13 pound baby. I started to think that 9 pounds wasn’t so big after all.

After talking to hundreds of pregnant women, however, I can safely say that most expecting moms, and their doctors have a paranoid fear of “The Big Baby. They are afraid the baby will be too big to come out get stuck.  I’ve even heard some women and one doctor say that they are afraid a large baby will make contractions more painful. This makes no logical sense whatsoever. But what about the worry that the baby might be too large to fit through the pelvis? Is this fear justified? It may be, in certain situations, but I would like to point out how there are other factors that are even more important than simply the baby’s size. In this video I explain how the baby’s position, or the way it is facing is more important than it’s size.

The position the baby is in is greatly influenced by the position the mom is in during labour. So moms can help baby to get into a good position by being upright, forward leaning or lying on their left, instead of lying back. This can be a challenge if mom has an epidural or morphine. This is why avoiding epidurals or narcotic analgesia as much as possible during labour, can help speed up labour and avoid cesareans.

Some other factors that affect the baby’s ability to easily fit through the pelvis have to do with the pelvis itself. If a mom has a big pelvis, there may be no problem. If she doesn’t have a large pelvis, or if the baby is not in an optimal position, then again, mom can get into upright positions that open the pelvis more to expand the pelvic outlet and help baby pass through.

You know how you start to feel your joints getting looser and falling apart in pregnancy? That’s due to the hormone relaxin. Relaxin softens the ligaments holding joints together, so that the pelvis can move and expand a little bit during labour. For example, squatting can expand the pelvic outlet by 33%. So squatting or other pelvic opening positions can be excellent in labour of baby is coming very slowly. Please not that if things are going really fast, do not get into a squatting position, cos then things are going to go too fast.

Hope this information help! If you would like to get more useful info or to take prenatal classes in Surrey, Langley or the Lower Mainland, email info@prenataljourney.ca or call 604 809 3288.

 

 

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  1. Pingback: How to know when Vaginal Exams in Pregnancy and Labour are useful and when they are harmful? - The Prenatal Journey The Prenatal Journey

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